5 Of The Most Interesting Roofs In The World

While a building’s roof may not strike everyone as being particularly interesting, there are any examples of roofs from around the world where a functional cover has been transformed into something more unique, since we know all houses need roofs and that0s why services like Emergency Roofers Dublin – Visit Their Website For More Information since these can help people keeping their roofs in good conditions. Although there are roofs with an architectural feat in and of itself; this can mean building green roofs, where the surface is used as a space for growing vegetation and as a natural habitat, or designing roofs that act as highly efficient, energy saving parts of an overall building. These, and other roofs from around the world, are discussed below.

1 – The Solaire, New York

The first building to be constructed in New York City with a completely green mandate, the Solaire was completed in 2003, and was designed by Rafael Pelli and Diana Balmori. The roof of this building, which is located in the Tribeca and Battery Park area of Manhattan, is 27 stories high and topped by a green roof covered in vegetation and other materials. The roof works to insulate the building, while releasing oxygen into the surrounding atmosphere – when combined with concrete for the main building, the green roof used in the Solaire helps to convect energy using recycled materials.

2 – Fiat Lingotto Building, Turin

Completed in 1913, the Fiat Lingotto Building in Turin, Italy, was originally designed as a factory for the Italian car manufacturer; the five floor building was created to act as a working factory, with each floor representing a different part of the design process – the roof of the building was the final stage of the factory process, where cars could be test driven around a test track. While the factory has since been converted into a university building, the race track has been retained for car clubs and special events – the rooftop track is one of only two in Europe, with the other being in Belgium.

3 – Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

Built between 2005 and 2008, the Academy of Sciences cost $500 million, and is one of the most sustainable and green buildings in the world; designed by Renzo Piano, the Academy is topped by 10,000 square metres of green vegetation, and also features a large amount of solar panels. The rest of the Academy of Sciences is home to features like a planetarium and a rainforest, with the ‘living roof’ including biodegradable trays for a wide assortment of plant life, and an open air terrace for people to observe the roof garden.

4 – Saint-Etienne Metropole Zenith, Saint-Etienne

One of a chain of venues around France, the Zenith building in Saint-Etienne is notable for acting as a natural wind scoop, which allows for the stadium to be cooled down using air currents. Completed in 2008, the Zenith building’s roof is made from aluminium, and is cantilevered to make it as aerodynamic as possible – when air passes through the roof, the currents are distributed around the auditorium, reducing the need for air conditioning, while also shielding the building from direct sunlight.

5 – Brazilian Leaf House, Rio de Janeiro

A striking sight on the coast near to Rio de Janeiro, the ‘Leaf House’ is so called for having a roof shaped like a leaf; designed by the fir of Mareines and Patalano Arquitetura, the roof and building were inspired by ancient Indian architecture, whereby the roof is sloped to provide protection from the sun, while also being ventilated to allow air currents to be convected from the nearby sea. The Leaf House is also notable for being made from almost all recycled materials, from bamboo meshes to reclaimed granite, and is intended to be closely harmonised with its surroundings.

This article was contributed by Scott Anderson. Scott Anderson has a keen interest in architecture and home improvements. He is currently thinking of sprucing up his garden with a patio heater.

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